FAQs – Duties and Taxes

The calculation of duties depends on the assessable value of a dutiable shipment. For the purpose of this calculation, dutiable goods are given a classification code that is known as the Harmonized System code.
  • Whether a shipment is a gift or not, it must still go through an import procedure as determined by custom’s law in the destination country. The shipment is cleared through customs based on the origin country, the value and quantity, but not its purpose. Dutiable shipments are subject to a customs duty, which is a tariff or tax imposed on goods when transported across international borders.
  • This system has been assigned by the World Customs Organization and continues to evolve.
To complete your delivery please pay required import duties and taxes with OnDemand Delivery.
To further process your shipment, payment is required. Click here to securely pay online, view the duty calculation, and download relevant documents.
You may also pay when you collect your shipment at the DHL ServicePoint location.

 You need a DHL account to pay duties and taxes for the receiver.

If you do not have one, you can contact us to Open an Account

The customs authorities in the destination country determine whether any duties and taxes are applicable when the parcel arrives.

  • This is based on the information provided on the shipping label (or waybill) and customs paperwork – in particular the shipment contents, declared value and weight.
  • Duties and taxes only apply to parcels traveling outside the European Union and not all goods are subject to these charges.
Yes, duties and taxes do not apply for parcels traveling within the European Union.

Goods Purchased Online

The online retailer has an agreement for DHL to deliver items ordered online.
  • Duties and taxes are most typically not included in the price of the goods you purchase online.
  • When purchasing goods online, some or all of these goods may not originate in the country you reside in.
  • When goods are not shipped domestically (within your country) or within a single customs union, such as the European Union, you are liable to pay any inbound duties and taxes which your local customs authority deems appropriate.
  • To ensure the DHL courier can deliver your goods in shortest possible transit time, when we enter your country, DHL pays the customs authority immediately on your behalf for any duties and taxes that are due on the goods.
  • DHL only releases the goods to you upon the full repayment of any duties and taxes that were paid on your behalf.

Although you ordered and purchased the goods online, the goods are still subject to an import procedure to clear the shipment through customs. Clearance depends on:

  • The country of origin
  • The value including transport charges
  • The quantity of goods

Each country has its own customs laws and the duties for different types of goods and values are set locally. DHL, like any other international transportation company, must adhere to local customs legislation and so DHL pays duties on the receiver’s behalf to clear shipments on arrival.

You will not be paying to DHL any further shipping costs. Rather, you will be asked instead to pay customs duties, taxes and other import charges related to customs clearance in your home country, as per local regulations.
Whether a shipment is a gift or not, it must still go through an import procedure as determined by custom’s law in the destination country. The shipment is cleared through customs based on the origin country, the value and quantity, but not its purpose. You will need to pay customs duty and taxes only if the value of the gift is above a stated local threshold.
Every country has limitations for imported goods that are used for personal use. This is to avoid misuse, and to distinguish imports for personal and commercial use.

Depending on value and the type of goods imported you may expect the following:

Customs import duties (percentage of shipment value and transport charges)

  • Local tax
  • DHL Advance Payment surcharge
  • Any regulatory charges, if applicable

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) must approve all imports for entry into the United States.  CBP requires entry summary documentation that includes shipment details and also identifies the Ultimate Consignee (a person, party, or designee that is located in the U.S. and will receive the shipment; usually the buyer of the goods).   In cases where the Ultimate Consignee is not identified or known and the shipment requires formal entry (goods valued over $2,500 or is subject to government control) DHL is required to complete Customs Form 5106 in order to file your IRS number with CBP:  eCFR :: 19 CFR 24.5 -- Filing identification number.  When required CBP will not accept the shipment into the U.S. without the IRS Number identifying the Ultimate Consignee.

There are two types of IRS numbers:

  • Employer Identification Number (EIN): Issued to business entities
  • Social Security Number (SSN): Issued to individuals

Further U.S. importer tips are available on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website.

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